Carlos Santero Barcelona/Spain

Carlos Santero Photography


Majestic Raptor

The golden eagle - National Symbol of Mexico The Golden Eagle is one of the largest, fastest, nimblest raptors in North America. Lustrous gold feathers gleam on the back of its head and neck; a powerful beak and talons advertise its hunting prowess. You're most likely to see this eagle in western North America, soaring on steady wings or diving in pursuit of the jackrabbits and other small mammals that are its main prey. Sometimes seen attacking large mammals, or fighting off coyotes or bears in defense of its prey and young, the Golden Eagle has long inspired both reverence and fear. Population in Europe: The biggest populations in Europe are in the Alps, Scotland, Scandinavia and Spain. The population in the Alps is around 1,200 breeding pairs and seems to be stable. In Bavaria, the breeding success was quite low during the last decades and the population of about 50 pairs has been stable mostly because of eagles from Austria or Switzerland moving to Bavaria. In recent years, the breeding success has improved in some areas in Bavaria due to conservation programs (for example by trying to reduce disturbance at the nest sites). The British population, which lives almost entirely in Scotland is about 442 according to the RSPB [RSPB 2008]. In Scandinavia there are about 1,700 - 2,000 pairs [Mebs & Schmidt 2006]. In Spain, there are about 1,440 pairs [SEO 2007] This picture was taken during my 2 days adventure in Buseu a lost village in the spanish pyrenees.

Happy landing

The golden eagle - National Symbol of Mexico The Golden Eagle is one of the largest, fastest, nimblest raptors in North America. Lustrous gold feathers gleam on the back of its head and neck; a powerful beak and talons advertise its hunting prowess. You're most likely to see this eagle in western North America, soaring on steady wings or diving in pursuit of the jackrabbits and other small mammals that are its main prey. Sometimes seen attacking large mammals, or fighting off coyotes or bears in defense of its prey and young, the Golden Eagle has long inspired both reverence and fear. Population in Europe: The biggest populations in Europe are in the Alps, Scotland, Scandinavia and Spain. The population in the Alps is around 1,200 breeding pairs and seems to be stable. In Bavaria, the breeding success was quite low during the last decades and the population of about 50 pairs has been stable mostly because of eagles from Austria or Switzerland moving to Bavaria. In recent years, the breeding success has improved in some areas in Bavaria due to conservation programs (for example by trying to reduce disturbance at the nest sites). The British population, which lives almost entirely in Scotland is about 442 according to the RSPB [RSPB 2008]. In Scandinavia there are about 1,700 - 2,000 pairs [Mebs & Schmidt 2006]. In Spain, there are about 1,440 pairs [SEO 2007] This picture was taken during my 2 days adventure in Buseu a lost village in the spanish pyrenees.

The eagle and the Rabbit

The golden eagle - National Symbol of Mexico The Golden Eagle is one of the largest, fastest, nimblest raptors in North America. Lustrous gold feathers gleam on the back of its head and neck; a powerful beak and talons advertise its hunting prowess. You're most likely to see this eagle in western North America, soaring on steady wings or diving in pursuit of the jackrabbits and other small mammals that are its main prey. Sometimes seen attacking large mammals, or fighting off coyotes or bears in defense of its prey and young, the Golden Eagle has long inspired both reverence and fear. Population in Europe: The biggest populations in Europe are in the Alps, Scotland, Scandinavia and Spain. The population in the Alps is around 1,200 breeding pairs and seems to be stable. In Bavaria, the breeding success was quite low during the last decades and the population of about 50 pairs has been stable mostly because of eagles from Austria or Switzerland moving to Bavaria. In recent years, the breeding success has improved in some areas in Bavaria due to conservation programs (for example by trying to reduce disturbance at the nest sites). The British population, which lives almost entirely in Scotland is about 442 according to the RSPB [RSPB 2008]. In Scandinavia there are about 1,700 - 2,000 pairs [Mebs & Schmidt 2006]. In Spain, there are about 1,440 pairs [SEO 2007] This picture was taken during my 2 days adventure in Buseu a lost village in the spanish pyrenees.


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Carlos Santero is a international awarded photographer, born as Holger Neuhaus in Essen Germany and based in Barcelona, Spain